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"We have to do something here," says Nataliia Yesyk, who fled Kiev about 14 days ago and has since been living with her daughter, who has cancer, and her son in the family home as a refugee family. Her husband has stayed in Kiev, holding down the fort with the family's grandparents. This or something similar is the situation of the nine Ukrainian families who have found shelter here with us in the parental home and whose children are being treated in the Essen University Hospital. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

The families exchange information and report regularly to each other and to us about how things are going for those "at home" in Ukraine. In Kiev, there are always reports of a special supply shortage, and so the decision is made without further ado, involving all the parents' homes: We have to do something here! Nataliia Pidschuk and other Ukrainian mothers roll up their sleeves and our current Russian host family does not hesitate to help. Other families at home are also immediately involved, especially 16-year-old Nikita from Kiev, and so the project "Relief supplies to Kiev" gains breathtaking momentum. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

We had been hesitant to respond to the many offers for donations in kind, as storage capacity is tight, but now we are giving the go-ahead. Folding tables are set up in our large garage and the families of the parents sort, fold, pack, label and 6-year-old Roksolana paints wonderful pictures for the homeland, which are glued onto the packed boxes: A -lichen greeting to the homeland and the loved ones left there. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

In addition to clothing and blankets, bandages, disinfectants and medicines are also needed on site ... and non-perishable food. Off we go in the car and buy a pallet of stew, sausages and crispbread. The transport is organized by colleagues of our chairwoman, Birgit Langwieler, from the Essen police headquarters, who have also provided the van. In addition to the help that is organized there, it is also about helping in itself: the refugees can finally do something for those they left at home - that also helps.

Regarding the transfer of the relief goods to the transporter at the border, there are always changes ... the situation on the ground is coming to a head ... but after a long back and forth, everything could be handed over. When the goods will actually arrive in Kiev, we do not know yet. But Nataliia's husband will surely let us know - also about whether Roksolana's pictures have brought the hoped-for joy. We have no doubts about that.